Chapter 16

Addendum

 

Why shouldn't truth be stranger than fiction?
After all, fiction has to make sense.
--Mark Twain

In this Addendum I hope to interest recruits, those that can endure cryptographic drudgery merely for the hope of 
discovery, for the chancy promise of a moment of fleeting intellectual delight. I expect them to be rewarded because 
there are few things that I have kept in reserve.

 For this purpose I have provided the code for a computer program written in Microsoft GWBASIC. But a computer 
is not absolutely necessary. One may cut up long strips of paper with two identical, twenty-one letter alphabets 
typewritten vertically, in series, on each one. Sliding them along beside one another is surely a way that the 
composers of caesar cryptograms produced their own ciphers 400 or more years ago. Sophisticated slide devices like 
this were recently in use in cryptographic parlors until computers displaced them.

 Unfortunately, a modern bedsidecopy of the plays or poems won't do for this work and the cost of an original 
forbids. For research, only a facsimile reprint of Shakespeare's publications will be of service. The spelling and even 
the phrasing of current editions has been corrected to suit modern editors: for example, the first word of dialogue in 
a recent copy of the First Folio is not "Bote-swaine" but "Bosun". The editors have done their readers many favors in 
rewording the allusions, modernizing the spelling and even in lifting whole passages from earlier versions of the 
plays and substituting them for others that were shown in the First Folio. The motives for these corrections are 
laudable because they were intended to improve the understanding and interest of students. However, only true 
reproductions of the originals are suitable for the uses of cryptology.

 Only sixteen (quarto editions) of the thirty-six plays assembled in the 1623 First Folio had previously been printed. 
There have been several facsimile reprints of the Folio published in the last hundred years and copies are likely to be 
located in a university or public library; other such editions include the poems and quarto versions of the plays. The 
most recent and widely distributed facsimile publication of the First Folio is one done by the Yale University Press 
from their copy (London: Goeffrey cumberlege, Oxford University Press, first edition of 1954, with subsequent 
printings in 1954 and 1955). The title is the same as the original. There are at least two earlier facsimiles. The best 
source for photo or xerographic copies, in the United States, of pages of the originals and of other 16th and 17th 
century material in printed or manuscript form, is the Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East capitol St. S.E., 
Washington, D. c. 20003 (202-544-4600). The library is administered by the Trustees of Amherst college. Requests are 
answered quickly and their charges are reasonable. The same is true of The Huntington Library, 1151 Oxford Road, 
San Marino, cA 91108 (818-405-2100). In England the most complete collections of Elizabethan and Jacobean books 
are to be found in the British Library, Reference Division, Photographic Service, Great Russell St., London WC1B 
3DG.

 There are at least three concordances to Shakespeare's works that have been produced. These are lists of all of the 
words the author employed, arranged in alphabetical order with a quotation of the line or sentence in which each of 
them occur; a citation is given for the name of the play, the act, the scene and the line number. The editors and 
publishers have agreed to a standard notation for their references. They have left the Acts alone (there are almost 
always five), but they have altered the Scenes so that often there are more scenes than the playwright labeled or 
planned on. This sometimes affects the line numbers as compared to counting them in the original. But a convention 
has been adopted and is used in the more recent references, as: W. Tale, iv, 4, 402 . This translates to "The Winters 
Tale, Act 4, Scene 4 at line 402 following the first line in that Act and Scene". Or perhaps L.L.L. v, 2, 552 . Still, only 
modern editions of the plays show where the newly defined Scenes begin. And Sonnet echoes should not be ignored; 
these are cited as: 1, 1, indicating Sonnet number 1, line number 1.     A compiled version of my cryptographic 
program on a 3 1/2" disk is available from the author for $10.00, and it is in the public domain.

 The follwing is a list of 267 versions of Bacon's name found in the 1623 Folio edition of the plays, the "apocryphal" 
plays printed in the 1664 Folio, and in the Poems. Using the program, the initial capital letters of each line of verse 
may be entered. Modern editions of the Works usually follow the same capitalization of the first letter of each line. 
Most "p." references are to pages in the Yale University 1954 facsimile of the 1623 First Folio (act, scene, line).

SHAKESPEARE - BACON CIPHER LOCATIONS
List of Initial capital letters only.

KEY

CAPS = Initial Capital Letters.
** = Alternate 1st Capital Letters.
*** = every 3rd 1st Capital Letter
**** = every 4th 1st Capital Letter
***** = every 5th 1st Capital Letter
****** = every 6th 1st Capital Letter
******* =every 7th 1st Capital Letter
[ = overlapping
$$ = open text "cipher" or "decipher" nearby.
+ = no. of lines following.
Quarto = Shakespeare quarto edition
Other references are to various Shakespeare facsimiles.
"To the memory"  Poem
("Front matter" pages preceding the plays)

BECEAN 1st 11 caps  {**CAPS}
ALL'S WELL THAT ENDS WELL

FRBEEKEEIN
1,1,245  {*****CAPS}
But my intents are fixt, and + 50

FRBBACEN
2,1,88 p.235  {******CAPS}
Bring in the Admiration, that we + 42

BECEN
2,3,130 p.238  {***CAPS}
The propertie by what + 12

BACEN
2,4,50 p.240  {**CAPS}
Par That you will take your + 8
ANTHONY AND CLEOPATRA

FBEKEAN
1,3,86 p.833  {**CAPS}
Ile leave you Lady. + 18

BECQYN
2,5,31 p.838  {CAPS}
Ile set thee in a shower of + 5

BECKAN
2,6,59 p.839  {****CAPS}
Ant That will I Pompey + 21

BECQQAN
3,13,79 p.847  {CAPS}
To heare from me you had + 6

BYKEN
4,7,8 p.850  {**CAPS}
Ant They do retyre. + 8

BECEN
5,2,8 p.855   {**CAPS}
The beggers Nurse, and Caesars + 9
AS YOU LIKE IT

BECAYN
Cel. I did not then intreat + 28

BACAN
3,2,103 p.195  {CAPS}
If the cat will after kinde + 4

BAKEAN
3,5,57 p.199  {*******CAPS}
Then any of her lineaments + 41
COMEDY OF ERRORS

FBICAN
1,1,1 p.85  {**CAPS}
Proceed Solinus to procure + 13

BECEN
4,1,32 p.93  {*****CAPS}
I pray you see him + 22

[BECON
[5,1,114 p.97  {******CAPS}
[To separate the husband and the + 24

[BYCEN
[5,1,135 p.97  {***CAPS}
[It cannot be that she hath done + 12

BEQEN
5,1,312 p.99  {**CAPS}
Though now this grained face of + 8

BACIN
$$5,1,336 p.99  {**CAPS}
S. Dromio I sir am Dromio + 9
CORIOLANUS

BEEKEN
1,4,26 p.603  {****CAPS}
Lar Their noise be our + 20

BOCEN
2,1,209 p. 607  {**CAPS}
But with them, change of Honors +10

BECAN
2,3,222 p.611  {*****CAPS}
Their Liberty, make them of no + 20

BACEN
4,6,114 p.622  {****CAPS}
Brut But is this true sir? + 18

BICEN
4,7,4 p.623  {**CAPS}
Their talke at Table, and + 8
CYMBELINE

BACEEN
1,1,113 p.860  {CAPS}
The loathnesse to depart + 15

FRBECENS
1,1,144 p.860  {**CAPS}
It is your fault that I + 10

BECEN
1,6,141 p.865  {**CAPS}
I dedicate my selfe to your + 8

BACQEAN
2,4,76 p.869  {**CAPS}
In Workemanship, and Value + 10

BECEN
3,5,87 p.875  {****CAPS}
I will not aske againe. + 18

BEQEN
4,2,69 p.877  {CAPS}
I haue heard of such. What + 4

BAKEN
4,2,388 p.880  {*****CAPS}
Ile hide my Master from the + 20

BYQEN
5,5,424 p.888  {****CAPS}
Ioy'd are we, that you are. + 22

BEKIN
5,5,487 p.889  {****CAPS}
+ FINIS Th'Imperiall Caesar, should + 12
HAMLET

BEKEEEN
1,2,86 p.744  {CAPS}
In obstinate Condolement, is + 18

BECEN
1,4,54 p.747  {CAPS}
That beetles o're his base into + 4

BEECEN
1,5,205 p.749  {***CAPS}
Then your particular demands + 14

BYQEN
2,1,112 p.750  {*****CAPS}
I am sorrie that with better + 25

BECCEN
3,1,30 p.755  {CAPS}
That he as 'twere by accident + 5

FBECEN
3,1,84 p.755  {CAPS}
Is sicklied o're with the pale + 4

[BECEIN
[3,2,64 p.757  {*****CAPS}
[To feed & cloath thee. Why + 29

[BEKEEN
[3,2,88 p.757  {CAPS}
[It is a damned Ghost that + 4

BECEN
3,3,92 1604 Quarto  {***CAPS}
That has no relish of salvation + 12

BECIN
3,4,49 1604 Quarto  {CAPS}
The heyday in the blood + 4

BECEN
3,4,210 p.762  {***CAPS}
These profound heaues + 13

BACAN
4,3,83 p.763  {CAPS}
Qu. I will not speake with + 4

BYKYN
4,7,4 p.765  {****CAPS}
That he which hath your Noble + 16

BACAN
4,7,36 1604 Quarto  {****CAPS}
I loved your father and we love + 33

BECAN
4,7,80 1604 Quarton  {****CAPS}
Then setled age, his fables + 23

[BEACENS
[4,7,127 p.766  {*****CAPS}
[The Frenchman gaue you, +28

[BAECEN
[4,7,143 p.766  {****CAPS}
[It may be death. + 20

[BAECEN
[4,7,167 p.766  {****CAPS}
[There on the pendant boughes + 16

BAACCEN
5,2,138 p.769  {****CAPS}
Hor. I, good my Lord. + 24
HENRY IV, PT.1

BACEN
1,1,79 p.350  {**CAPS}
In enuy, that my lord + 8

BAKEN
That I will by tomorrow + 4

[BEEQEN
[3,1,71 p.362  {*****CAPS}
[Mort The Arch-Deacon hath + 25

[BECKEN
[3,1,78 p.362  {*****CAPS}
[The remnant Northward, lying + 25

BEECAN
3,1,144 p.363  {***CAPS}
Ile haste the Writer; and + 16

BECCAN
3,1,176 p.363  {***CAPS}
In strange concealments: + 15

BACEN
5,2,5 p.372  {***CAPS}
The King would keepe his word + 13