Chapter 14 (c)

Documentation 

An Alarum: Excursions. Enter Sir Iohn
Falstaffe, and a Captaine.

Following this stage direction, "Alarum" (loud noises) and "Excursions" (much rushing about), this dialogue follows 
("First Part of King Henry the Sixt," iii, 2, 104):

Capt. Whither away Sir Iohn Falstaffe, in such haste?
Falst. Whither away? to saue my selfe by flight,
We are like to haue the ouerthrow againe.
Capt. What? will you flye, and leaue Lord Talbot?
Falst. I, all the Talbots in the World, to save my life.

Ciphertext is:
V H I T H E R A V A Y S I R I O H N F A L S T A F F E I N S V C H H A S T E V H I T H E R A V A Y T O S A V E 
M Y S E L F E B Y F L I G H T V E A R E L I K E T O H A V E T H E O V E R T H R O V A G A I N E V H A T V I L 
L Y O V F L Y E A N D L E A V E L O R D T A L B O T

Plaintext, +4 is:

C M N B M I Y E C E D A N Y N S M R K E P A B E K K I N R A C G M M E A B I C M N B M I Y E C E D B S A E 
C I Q D A I P K I F D K P N L M B C I E Y I P N O I B S M E C I B M I S C I Y B M Y S C E L E N R I C M E B C N P 
P D S C K P D I E R H P I E C I P S Y H B E P F S B

Plaintext reversed is:

B S F P E B H Y S P I C E I P H R E I D P K C S D P P N C B E M C I R N E L E C S Y M B Y I C S I M B I C E M S B I 
O N P I Y E I C B M L N P K D F I K P I A D Q I C E A S B D E C E Y I M B N M C I B A E M M G C A R N I K K E 
B A P E K R M S N Y N A D E C E Y I M B N M C

* * *

"And long vpon these termes I held my Citty,
Till thus hee gan besiege me: Gentle maid
Haue of my suffering youth some feeling pitty
And be not of my holy vowes affraid,
Thats to ye sworne to none was euer said,
For feasts of loue I haue bene call'd unto
Till now did nere inuite nor neuer vovv.

This poem, A Lovers complaint, (verse 26, l. 175) is not credited to Shakespeare by most critics (notwithstanding that 
it is labeled "By William Shake-speare"), but the word "suffering" attracts our attention. A version of "suffer" is 
sometimes found within a Bacon cipher manifestation; "suffering" does sound a lot like "ciphering", after all.

Ciphertext is:
A N D L O N G V P O N T H E S E T E R M E S I H E L D M Y C I T T Y T I L L T H V S H E E G A N B E S I E G E 
M E G E N T L E M A I D H A V E O F M Y S V F F E R I N G Y O V T H S O M E F E E L I N G P I T T Y A N D B E 
N O T O F M Y H O L Y V O E V S A F F R A I D T H A T S T O Y E S V O R N E T O N O N E V A S E V E R S A I 
D F O R F E A S T S O F L O V E I H A V E B E N E C A L L D V N T O T I L L N O V D I D N E R E I N V I T E N O 
R N E V E R V O V

Plaintext, +4 is:

E R H P S R L C T S R B M I A I B I Y Q I A N M I P H Q D G N B B D B N P P B M C A M I I L E R F I A N I L I Q I 
L I R B P I Q E N H M E C I S K Q D A C K K I Y N R L D S C B M A S Q I K I I P N R L T N B B D E R H F I R S B S 
K Q D M S P D C S I C A E K K Y E N H B M E B A B S D I A C S Y R I B S R S R I C E A I C I Y A E N H K S Y K I E 
A B A S K P S C I N M E C I F I R I G E P P H C R B S B N P P R S C H N H R I Y I N R C N B I R S Y R I C I Y C S C

* * *

"Suffer" appears again in "The Tragedie of Macbeth" (ii, 3, 125) accompanied by two versions of the author's name:

Looke to the Lady
And when we haue our naked Frailties hid,
That suffer in exposure;

Ciphertext is:
A N D V H E N V E H A V E O V R N A K E D F R A I L T I E S H I D T H A T S V F F E R I N E P O S V R E

Plaintext, +4 is:

E R H C M I R C I M E C I S C Y R E O I H K Y E N P B N I A M N H B M E B A C K K I Y N R I T S A C Y I

Plaintext, alternate letters:

R C I C M C S Y E I K E P N A N B E A K I N I S C I

Notice that "suffer" is part of the ciphertext which produces the plaintext name of "BACKKIYN."

* * *

Another appearance of "suffer" is found in "The Tragedy of Coriolanus" (i, 1, 81):

Men. . . you slander The Helmes o'th State; who care for you like Fathers, When you curse them as Enemies.
2. Cit. Care for vs? True indeed, they nere car'd for vs yet. Suffer vs to famish, and their Store-houses cramm'd with 
Graine:

Ciphertext is:
T H E H E L M E S O T H S T A T E V H O C A R E F O R Y O V L I K E F A T H E R S V H E N Y O V C V R S E T 
H E M A S E N E M I E S C A R E F O R V S T R V E I N D E E D T H E Y N E R E C A R D F O R V S Y E T S V F F 
E R V S T O F A M I S H A N D T H E I R S T O R E H O V S E S C R A M M D V I T H G R A I N E

Plaintext, +4 is:

B M I M I P Q I A S B M A B E B I C M S G E Y I K S Y D S C P N O I K E B M I Y A C M I R D S C G C Y A I B M I 
Q E A I R I Q N I A G E Y I K S Y C A B Y C I N R H I I H B M I D R I Y I G E Y H K S Y C A D I B A C K K I Y C A 
B S K E Q N A M E R H B M I N Y A B S Y I M S C A I A G Y E Q Q H C N B M L Y E N R I

Plaintext reversed is:

I R N E Y L M B N C H Q Q E Y G A I A C S M I Y S B A Y N I M B H R E M A N Q E K S B A C Y I K K C A B I D 
A C Y S K H Y E G I Y I R D I M B H I I H R N I C Y B A C Y S K I Y E G A I N Q I R I A E Q I M B I A Y C G C S D 
R I M C A Y I M B E K I O N P C S D Y S K I Y E G S M C I B E B A M B S A I Q P I M I M B

* * *

"To be contracted in one brow of woe:
Yet so farre hath Discretion fought with Nature,"

In these two lines from "The Tragedie of Hamlet" (ii, 2, 4). "So farre" would also qualify as a homonym for "cipher." 
We will search for it.

Ciphertext is:

T O B E C O N T R A C T E D I N O N E B R O V O F V O E Y E T S O F A R R E H A T H D I S C R E T I O N F O V 
G H T V I T H N A T V R E

Ciphertext reversed is:

E R V T A N H T I V T H G V O F N O I T E R C S I D H T A H E R R A F O S T E Y E O V F O V O R B E N O N I D 
E T C A R T N O C E B O T

Plaintext, +4 is:

I Y C B E R M B N C B M L C S K R S N B I Y G A N H M B E M I Y Y E K S A B I D I S C K S C S Y F I R S R N H I B 
G E Y B R S G I F S B

No apologies for "BIYGAN"; "SYFIR" ratifies that spelling too.

In "Loves Labors lost" (ii, 1, 149) there is another brief example: "His requests so farre"

Ciphertext is:
H I S R E Q V E S T S S O F A R R E

Plaintext is:

M N A Y I V C I A B A A S K E Y Y I

Plaintext reversed:

I Y Y E K S A A B A I C V I Y A N M

* * *

Bacon's endorsement can be found almost adjacent to another "cipher" equivalent in "The Merry Wives of Windsor" 
(iv, 4, 11), and these lines did not appear in the 1602 Quarto edition:

Page. 'Tis well, 'tis well, no more:
be not as extreme in submission, as in offence,

Ciphertext is:
N O M O R E B E N O T A S E T R E M E I N S V B M I S S I O N

Plaintext, +4 is:

R S Q S Y I F I R S B E A I B Y I Q I N R A C F Q N A A N S R

* * *

From "The Comedie of Errors" (v, 1, 108):

Ab. . .Therefore depart, and leaue him heere with me.
Adr. I will not hence, and leave my husband heere:
And ill it doth beseeme your holiness
To separate the husband and the wife.
Ab. Be quiet and depart, thou shalt not haue him.
Luc. Complaine vnto the Duke of this indignity.
Adr. Come go, I will fall prostrate at his feete,

Ciphertext is:
T H E R E F O R E D E P A R T A N D L E A V E H I M H E E R E V I T H M E I V I L L N O T H E N C E A N D L E 
A V E M Y H V S B A N D H E E R E A N D I L L I T D O T H B E S E E M E Y O V R H O L I N E S S E T O S E P A 
R A T E T H E H V S B A N D A N D T H E V I F E B E Q V I E T A N D D E P A R T T H O V S H A L T N O T H A 
V E H I M C O M P L A I N E V N T O T H E D V K E O F T H I S I N D I G N I T Y C O M E G O I V I L L F A L L P 
R O S T R A T E A T H I S F E E T E

Ciphertext reversed is:

E T E E F S I H T A E T A R T S O R P L L A F L L I V I O G E M O C Y T I N G I D N I S I H T F O E K V D E H T O 
T N V E N I A L P M O C M I H E V A H T O N T L A H S V O H T T R A P E D D N A T E I V Q E B E F I V E H T 
D N A D N A B S V H E H T E T A R A P E S O T E S S E N I L O H R V O Y E M E E S E B H T O D T I L L I D N A 
E R E E H D N A B S V H Y M E V A E L D N A E C N E H T O N L L I V I E M H T I V E R E E H M I H E V A E L 
D N A T R A P E D E R O F E R E H T

Plaintext, +4 is:

I B I I K A N M B E I B E Y B A S Y T P P E K P P N C N S L I Q S G D B N R L N H R N A N M B K S I O C H I M B 
S B R C I R N E P T Q S G Q N M I C E M B S R B P E M A C S M B B Y E T I H H R E B I N C V I F I K N C I M B H 
R E H R E F A C M I M B I B E Y E T I A S B I A A I R N P S M Y C S D I Q I I A I F M B S H B N P P N H R E I Y I I 
M H R E F A C M D Q I C E I P H R E I G R I M B S R P P N C N I Q M B N C I Y I I M Q N M I C E I P H R E B Y E 
T I H I Y S K I Y I M B

* * *

Now for a stanza from "The Rape of Lucrece" (1, 3, ln. 1695):

At this request, with noble disposition,
Each present Lord began to promise aide,
As bound in Knighthood to her imposition,
Longing to heare the hatefull Foe bewraide.
But shee that yet her sad taske hath not said,
The protestation stops, o speake quoth shee
How may this forced staine be wip'd from me?

(Tarqvin has done his dreadful deed.)

Ciphertext is:
A T T H I S R E Q V E S T V I T H N O B L E D I S P O S I T I O N E A C H P R E S E N T L O R D B E G A N T O P 
R O M I S E A I D E A S B O V N D I N K N I G H T H O O D T O H E R I M P O S I T I O N L O N G I N G T O H E 
A R E T H E H A T E F V L L F O E B E V R A I D E B V T S H E E T H A T Y E T H E R S A D T A S K E H A T H N 
O T S A I D T H E P R O T E S T A T I O N S T O P S O S P E A K E Q V O T H S H E E H O V M A Y T H I S F O R 
C E D S T A I N E B E V I P D F R O M M E

Ciphertext reversed is:

E M M O R F D P I V E B E N I A T S D E C R O F S I H T Y A M V O H E E H S H T O V Q E K A E P S O S P O T S 
N O I T A T S E T O R P E H T D I A S T O N H T A H E K S A T D A S R E H T E Y T A H T E E H S T V B E D I A 
R V E B E O F L L V F E T A H E H T E R A E H O T G N I G N O L N O I T I S O P M I R E H O T D O O H T H G I 
N K N I D N V O B S A E D I A E S I M O R P O T N A G E B D R O L T N E S E R P H C A E N O I T I S O P S I D E 
L B O N H T I V T S E V Q E R S I H T T A

Plaintext, +4 is:

I Q Q S Y K H T N C I F I R N E B A H I G Y S K A N M B D E Q C S M I I M A M B S C V I O E I T A S A T S B A R 
S N B E B A I B S Y T I M B H N E A B S R M B E M I O A E B H E A Y I M B I D B E M B I I M A B C F I H N E Y C 
I F I S K P P C K I B E M I M B I Y E I M S B L R N L R S P R S N B N A S T Q N Y I M S B H S S M B M L N R O R N 
H R C S F A E I H N E I A N Q S Y T S B R E L I F H Y S P B R I A I Y T M G E I R S N B N A S T A N H I P F S R M 
B N C B A I C V I Y A N M B B E

Plaintext, alternate letters:

I Q Y H N I I N B H G S A M D Q S I M M S V O I A A S A S B B I S T M H E B R B M O E H A I B D E B I A C I N Y 
I I K P K B M M I E M B R L S R N N S Q Y M B S M M N O N R S A I N I N S T B E I H S B I I T G I S B A T N I F R 
B C A C I A M B

* * *

Also from "The Rape of Lucrece" (line 862):

So then he hath it when he cannot vse it,
And leaues it to be maistred by his yong:
VVho in their pride do presently abuse it,
Their father was too weake, and they too strong

Ciphertext is:
H E C A N N O T V S E I T A N D L E A V E S I T T O B E M A I S T R E D B Y H I S Y O N G V H O I N T H E I R P 
R I D E D O P R E S E N T L Y A B V S E I T T H E I R F A T H E R V A S T O O V E A K E A N D T H E Y T O O S T 
R O N G

Ciphertext reversed is:

G N O R T S O O T Y E H T D N A E K A E V O O T S A V R E H T A F R I E H T T I E S V B A Y L T N E S E R P O 
D E D I R P R I E H T N I O H V G N O Y S I H Y B D E R T S I A M E B O T T I S E V A E L D N A T I E S V T O N 
N A C E H

Plaintext, +4 is:

L R S Y B A S S B D I M B H R E I O E I C S S B A E C Y I M B E K Y N I M B B N I A C F E D P B R I A I Y T S H I H 
N Y T Y N I M B R N S M C L R S D A N M D F H I Y B A N E Q I F S B B N A I C E I P H R E B N I A C B S R R E 
G I M

Plaintext, alternate letters:

L S B S B I B R I E C S A C I B K N M B I C E P R A Y S I N T N M R S C R D N D H Y A E I S B A C I H E N A B R E 
I

* * *

An odd place to find Francis Bacon's cipher signature is in "WILLOBI / HIS / AVISA / OR / The true Picture of a 
mo / dest Maid, and of a chast and / constant wife. This was published anonymously in 1594 by "Hadrian Dorrell" 
who acted as editor.

The second stanza of the introductory verse has attracted the attention of scholars because it contains the earliest 
direct mention of Shakespeare in the literature.

Though Collatine haue deerely bought,
To high renowne, a lasting life,
And found that most in vaine have fought,
To have a Faire, and Constant wife
Yet Tarquyne pluckt his glistering grape,
And Shake-speare, paints poore Lucrece rape.

The reference is to "The Rape of Lucrece," published in the same year. We will direct our attention to the last page 
which contains fifteen rhyming lines; only the following will be quoted:

Ciphertext of the fourth line is: "Now foolish fancie was the cavse. This Cryse did lament."

Ciphertext is:
N O V F O O L I S H F A N C I E V A S T H E C A V S E T H I S C R Y S E D I D L A M E N T

Ciphertext reversed is:

T N E M A L D I D E S Y R C S I H T E S V A C E H T S A V E I C N A F H S I L O O F V O N

Plaintext, +4 is:

B R I Q E P H N H I A D Y G A N M B I A C E G I M B A E C I N G R E K M A N P S S K C S R

Ciphertext of the eighth line is: "If fickle-headed Hellen covld at first have bene content"
I F F I C K L E H E A D E D H E L L E N C O V L D A T F I R S T H A V E B E N E C O N T E N T

Plaintext, +4 is:

N K K N G O P I M I E H I H M I P P I R G S C P H E B K N Y A B M E C I F I R I G S R B I R B

Ciphertext of the twelfth line is:

"This wisedome beares the chiefest sway to stay when we be well."
T H I S V I S E D O M E B E A R E S T H E C H I E F E S T S V A Y T O S T A Y V H E N V E B E V E L L

Ciphertext reversed is:

L L E V E B E V N E H V Y A T S O T Y A V S T S E F E I H C E H T S E R A E B E M O D E S I V S I H T

Plaintext, +4 is:

P P I C I F I C R I M C D E B A S B D E C A B A I K I N M G I M B A I Y E I F I Q S H I A N C A N M B

The anonymous author's name need no longer be unknown.

* * *

We may witness this author once more at work by comparing the text from the last two lines of the (anonymously 
published) Quarto edition of "The Chronicle Historie of Henry the Fift" (1600) and the same lines, plus a newly 
created Epilogue which follows, in "The Life of Henry the Fift," the 1623 Folio (v, 2, 372).

The Quarto shows these words:

Then will I sweare to Kate, and Kate to mee:
And may our vowes once made, vnbroken bee.
Afterward, for the Folio, these lines were rewritten:
Then shall I sweare to Kate, and you to me,
And may our Oathes well kept and prosp'rous be.
Now the fourteen lines of the new, 1623 Epilogue begin:
Thus farre with rough, and all-unable Pen,
Our bending Author hath pursu'd the Story. . .

We shall study these four lines from the Folio.

Ciphertext is:
T H E N S H A L L I S V E A R E T O K A T E A N D Y O V T O M E A N D M A Y O V R O A T H E S V E L L K E P 
T A N D P R O S P R O V S B E T H V S F A R R E V I T H R O V G H A N D A L L V N A B L E P E N O V R B E N 
D I N G A V T H O R H A T H P V R S V D T H E S T O R Y

Plaintext, +4 is:

B M I R A M E P P N A C I E Y I B S O E B I E R H D S C B S Q I E R H Q E D S C Y S E B M I A C I P P O I T B E R 
H T Y S A T Y S C A F I B M C A K E Y Y I C N B M Y S C L M E R H E P P C R E F P I T I R S C Y F I R H N R L E 
C B M S Y M E B M T C Y A C H B M I A B S Y D

Plaintext reversed is:

D Y S B A I M B H C A Y C T M B E M Y S M B C E L R N H R I F Y C S R I T I P F E R C P P E H R E M L C S Y M 
B N C I Y Y E K A C M B I F A C S Y T A S Y T H R E B T I O P P I C A I M B E S Y C S D E Q H R E I Q S B C S D H 
R E I B E O S B I Y E I C A N P P E M A R I M B

* * *

Here is a passage from "The Winters Tale" (iv, 4, 714):

Shep. I will tell the King all, every word, yea and his Sonnes prancks too; who, I may say, is no honest man, neither 
to his Father, nor to me, to goe about to make me the Kings Brother in Law.
Clow. Indeed Brother in Law was the farthest off you could have beene to him, and then your Blood had beene the 
dearer, by I know how much an ounce.
Aut. Very wisely (Puppies.)

Ciphertext is:
I S N O H O N E S T M A N N E I T H E R T O H I S F A T H E R N O R T O M E T O G O E A B O V T T O M A K E 
M E T H E K I N G S B R O T H E R I N L A V I N D E E D B R O T H E R I N L A V V A S T H E F A R T H E S T O 
F F Y O V C O V L D H A V E B E E N E T O H I M

Plaintext, +4 is:

N A R S M S R I A B Q E R R I N B M I Y B S M N A K E B M I Y R S Y B S Q I B S L S I E F S C B B S Q E O I Q I B M 
I O N R L A F Y S B M I Y N R P E C N R H I I H F Y S B M I Y N R P E C C E A B M I K E Y B M I A B S K K D S C 
G S C P H M E C I F I I R I B S M N Q

Plaintext reversed is:

Q N M S B I R I I F I C E M H P C S G C S D K K S B A I M B Y E K I M B A E C C E P R N Y I M B S Y F H I I H R N 
C E P R N Y I M B S Y F A L R N O I M B I Q I O E Q S B B C S F E I S L S B I Q S B Y S R Y I M B E K A N M S B Y I 
M B N I R R E Q B A I R S M S R A N

A "farthell" being a bundle or a parcel, the next line is:

Shep. Well: let us to the King: there is that in this Farthell, will make him scratch his Beard.

Thoughtfully scratching, we might assume.

* * *

In "Loves Labour's lost" (v, 2, 216) we read:

Rosa. . . Curtsie sweet hearts, and so the Measure ends.
Kin. More measure of this measure, be not nice.

Ciphertext is:
C V R T S I E S V E E T H E A R T S A N D S O T H E M E A S V R E E N D S M O R E M E A S V R E O F T H I S M 
E A S V R E B E N O T N I C E

Plaintext, +4 is:

G C Y B A N I A C I I B M I E Y B A E R H A S B M I Q I E A C Y I I R H A Q S Y I Q I E A C Y I S K B M N A Q I E 
A C Y I F I R S B R N G I

Plaintext, +4 reversed is:

I G N R B S R I F I Y C A E I Q A N M B K S I Y C A E I Q I Y S Q A H R I I Y C A E I Q I M B S A H R E A B Y E I M 
B I I C A I N A B Y C G

* * *

Did Francis Bacon write Shakespeare's Sonnet 148? Will you "say it is not so," as the author queried in the following 
quotation:

O Me! what eyes hath loue put in my head,
Which have no correspondence with true sight,
Or if they haue, where is my iudgment fled,
That censures falsely what they see aright?
If that be faire whereon my false eyes dote,
What meanes the world to say it is not so?
If it be not, then loue doth well denote,

Ciphertext is:
O H M E V H A T E Y E S H A T H L O V E P V T I N M Y H E A D V H I C H H A V E N O C O R R E S P O N D E 
N C E V I T H T R V E S I G H T O R I F T H E Y H A V E V H E R E I S M Y I V D G M E N T F L E D T H A T C E 
N S V R E S F A L S E L Y V H A T T H E Y S E E A R I G H T I F T H A T B E F A I R E V H E R E O N M Y F A L S 
E E Y E S D O T E V H A T M E A N E S T H E V O R L D T O S A Y I T I S N O T S O I F I T B E N O T T H E N L O 
V E D O T H V E L L D E N O T E

Plaintext, +4 is:

S M Q I C M E B I D I A M E B M P S C I T C B N R Q D M I E H C M N G M M E C I R S G S Y Y I A T S R H I R G 
I C N B M B Y C I A N L M B S Y N K B M I D M E C I C M I Y I N A Q D N C H L Q I R B K P I H B M E B G I R A 
C Y I A K E P A I P D C M E B B M I D A I I E Y N L M B N K B M E B F I K E N Y I C M I Y I S R Q D K E P A I I D 
I A H S B I C M E B Q I E R I A B M I C S Y P H B S A E D N B N A R S B A S N K N B F I R S B B M I R P S C I H S 
B M C I P P H I R S B I

* * *

In "The Winters Tale" (iv, 4, 595), a question of ethics arises in these lines:

Cam. My Lord,
Feare none of this: I thinke you know my fortunes
Doe all lye there: it shall be so my care,
To haue you royally appointed, as if
The Scene you play, were mine. For instance Sir,
That you may know you shall not want: one word.

Enter Autolicus

Aut. Ha, ha, what a Foole Honestie is? and Trust (his sworne brother) a very simple Gentleman. I have sold all my 
Tromperie: not a counterfeit Stone,

One actor plays another's part? Honestie and Trust become a farce? "Tromperie" (trumpery) implies fraud and 
trickery! The "counterfeit" word must be interpreted, and it is the "one word."

Ciphertext is:
H A H A V H A T A F O O L E H O N E S T I E I S A N D T R V S T H I S S V O R N E B R O T H E R A V E R Y S I 
M P L E G E N T L E M A N I H A V E S O L D A L L M Y T R O M P E R I E N O T A C O V N T E R F E I T S T O 
N E

Plaintext, +4 is:

M E M E C M E B E K S S P I M S R I A B N I N A E R H B Y C A B M N A A C S Y R I F Y S B M I Y E C I Y D A N 
Q T P I L I R B P I Q E R N M E C I A S P H E P P Q D B Y S Q T I Y N I R S B E G S C R B I Y K I N B A B S R I

Ciphertext reversed is:

E N O T S T I E F R E T N V O C A T O N E I R E P M O R T Y M L L A D L O S E V A H I N A M E L T N E G E L P 
M I S Y R E V A R E H T O R B E N R O V S S I H T S V R T D N A S I E I T S E N O H E L O O F A T A H V A H A 
H

Plaintext, +4 is:

I R S B A B N I K Y I B R C S G E B S R I N Y I T Q S Y B D Q P P E H P S A I C E M N R E Q I P B R I L I P T Q N A 
D Y I C E Y I M B S Y F I R Y S C A A N M B A C Y B H R E A N I N B A I R S M I P S S K E B E M C E M E M

Once more we have, in three lines, "name," "Bacon" and "cipher."

* * *

Leonatus Posthumus complains bitterly of the infidelity of women, in "The Tragedie of Cymbeline" (ii, 5, 3):

And that most venerable man, which I
Did call my Father, was, I know not where
When I was stampt. Some Coyner with his Tooles
Made me a counterfeit: yet my mother seem'd
The Dian of that time: so doth my Wife
The Non-pareill of this. Oh Vengeance, Vengeance!
Me of my lawfull pleasure she restrain'd,
And pray'd me oft forbearance:

Ciphertext is:
S O M E C O Y N E R V I T H H I S T O O L E S M A D E M E A C O V N T E R F E I T Y E T M Y M O T H E R S E E 
M D T H E D I A N O F T H A T T I M E S O D O T H M Y V I F E T H E N O N P A R E I L L O F T H I S O V E N G 
E A N C E V E N G E A N C E M E O F M Y L A V F V L L P L E A S V R E S H R E S T R A I N D A N D P R A Y D 
M E O F T F O R B E A R A N C E

Plaintext, +4 is:

A S Q I G S D R I Y C N B M M N A B S S P I A Q E H I Q I E G S C R B I Y K I N B D I B Q D Q S B M I Y A I I Q H 
B M I H N E R S K B M E B B N Q I A S H S B M Q D C N K I B M I R S R T E Y I N P P S K B M N A S C I R L I E R 
G I C I R L I E R G I Q I S K Q D P E C K C P P T P I E A C Y I A M Y I A B Y E N R H E R H T Y E D H Q I S K B K 
S Y F I E Y E R G I

Again we find a phonetic "cipher" connected with "counterfeit."

* * *

In "As you like it" (iv, 3, 166), the word "counterfeit" is repeated six times in seventeen lines for no good reason 
except stress:

Oli. Be of good cheere youth: you a man? You lacke a mans heart.
Ros. I doe so, I confesse it: Ah, sirra, a body would thinke this was well counterfeited, I pray you tell your brother 
how well I counterfeited: heigh-ho.
Oli. This was not counterfeit, there is too great testimony in your complexion that it was a passion of earnest.
Ros. Counterfeit, I assure you.
Oli. Well then, take a good heart, and counterfeit to be a man.
Ros. So I doe: but yfaith, I should have beene a woman by right.
Cel. Come, you looke paler and paler: pray you draw homewards: good sir, goe with us.
Oli. That will I: for I must beare answere backe. How you excuse my brother, Rosalind.
Ros. I shall deuise something: but I pray you commend my counterfeiting to him: will you goe?

Exeunt.

Ciphertext is:
A B O D Y V O V L D T H I N K E T H I S V A S V E L L C O V N T E R F E I T E D I P R A Y Y O V T E L L Y O V R 
B R O T H E R H O V V E L L I C O V N T E R F E I T E D H E I G H H O T H I S V A S N O T C O V N T E R F E I T 
T H E R E I S T O O G R E A T T E S T I M O N Y I N Y O V R C O M P L E I O N T H A T I T V A S A P A S S I O N 
O F E A R N E S T C O V N T E R F E I T I A S S V R E Y O V V E L L T H E N T A K E A G O O D H E A R T A N D 
C O V N T E R F E I T T O B E A M A N S O I D O E B V T Y F A I T H I S H O V L D H A V E B E E N A V O M A 
N B Y R I G H T

Plaintext, +4 is:

E F S H D C S C P H B M N R O I B M N A C E A C I P P G S C R B I Y K I N B I H N T Y E D D S C B I P P D S C Y 
F Y S B M I Y M S C C I P P N G S C R B I Y K I N B I H M I N L M M S B M N A C E A R S B G S C R B I Y K I N B 
B M I Y I N A B S S L Y I E B B I A B N Q S R D N R D S C Y G S Q T P I N S R B M E B N B C E A E T E A A N S R 
S K I E Y R I A B G S C R B I Y K I N B N E A A C Y I D S C C I P P B M I R B E O I E L S S H M I E Y B E R H G S C 
R B I Y K I N B B S F I E Q E R A S N H S I F C B D K E N B M N A M S C P H M E C I F I I R E C S Q E R F D Y N L 
M B

Here we see the name five times, followed by the word "CIFIIR." The emphasis is awesome. Even more accent is 
placed on the definitive ciphertext word "counterfeit" in "The First Part of King Henry the Fourth" (v, 4, 115), where 
it may be found nine times in twelve lines.

Falst. Imbowell'd? If thou imbowell mee to day, Ile giue you leaue to powder me, and eat me too to morrow. 'Twas 
time to counterfet, or that hotte Termagant Scot, has paid me scot and lot too. Counterfeit? I am no counterfeit; to 
dye, is to be a counterfeit, for hee is but the counterfeit of a man, who hath not the life of a man: But to counterfeit 
dying, when a man thereby liueth, is to be no counterfeit, but the true and perfect image of life indeede. The better 
part of Valour, is Discretion; in the which better part, I have saued my life. I am affraide of this Gun-Powder Percy 
though he be dead. How if hee should counterfeit too, and rise? I am afraid hee would prove the better counterfeit: 
therefore Ile make him sure: yea, and Ile sweare I kill'd him. Why may not hee rise as well as I: Nothing confutes me 
but eyes, and no-bodie sees me . . . [Emphasis supplied.]

For every "counterfeit" in this passage, we may read "BIYKIN", and nine times. Our eyes have confuted the 
supposed author; now we may perceive who is truly holding the pen.

So that its significance may not be overlooked, here is the Merriam-Webster unabridged dictionary definition of this 
word:

Counterfeit: 1.(a) SPURIOUS, not genuine or authentic;
esp: not composed by the author indicated.

Hereafter we may leave the counterfeit labels on some old books to trustful schoolmasters.

* * *

"Counterfait" is a another spelling of the word but still serviceable. We find it, again accompanied by a varied 
spelling of "cipher," in "Romeo and Juliet" (iii, 5, 131):

Thou counterfaits a Barke, a Sea, a Wind:
For still thy eyes, which I may call the Sea,
Do ebbe and flow with teares,

Ciphertext is:
T H O V C O V N T E R F A I T S A B A R K E A S E A A V I N D F O R S T I L L T H Y E Y E S V H I C H I M A Y C 
A L L T H E S E A D O E B B E A N D F L O V V I T H T E A R E S

Plaintext, +4 is:

B M S C G S C R B I Y K E N B A E F E Y O I E A I E E C N R H K S Y A B N P P B M D I D I A C M N G M N Q E D 
G E P P B M I A I E H S I F F I E R H K P S C C N B M B I E Y I A

* * *

In "Much adoe about Nothing" (ii, 3, 96), the "counterfeit" word appears again, thrice uttered and again near "syfir."

Leon. No, nor I neither, but most wonderful, that she should so dote on signior Benedicke, whom shee hath in all 
outward behauiours seemed ever to abhorre.
Bene. Is't possible? sits the winde in that corner?
Leo. By my troth my Lord, I cannot tell what to thinke of it,
but that she loues him with an inraged affection, it is past
Prince. May be she doth but counterfeit.
Claud. Faith like enough.
Leon. O God! counterfeit? there was neuer counterfeit of passion came so neere the life of passion as she discouers it.

Ciphertext is:
N O N O R I N E I T H E R B V T M O S T V O N D E R F V L T H A T S H E S H O V L D S O D O T E O N S I G N I 
O R B E N E D I C K E V H O M S H E E H A T H I N A L L O V T V A R D B E H A V I O V R S S E E M E D E V E 
R T O A B H O R R E I S T P O S S I B L E S I T S T H E V I N D E I N T H A T C O R N E R B Y M Y T R O T H M Y 
L O R D I C A N N O T T E L L V H A T T O T H I N K E O F I T B V T T H A T S H E L O V E S H I M V I T H A N 
I N R A G E D A F F E C T I O N I T I S P A S T T H E I N F I N I T E O F T H O V G H T M A Y B E S H E D O T H 
B V T C O V N T E R F E I T F A I T H L I K E E N O V G H O G O D C O V N T E R F E I T T H E R E V A S N E V 
E R C O V N T E R F E I T O F P A S S I O N C A M E S O N E E R E T H E L I F E O F P A S S I O N A S S H E D I S 
C O V E R S I T

Plaintext, +4 is:

R S R S Y N R I N B M I Y F C B Q S A B C S R H I Y K C P B M E B A M I A M S C P H A S H S B I S R A N L R N S 
Y F I R I H N G O I C M S Q A M I I M E B M N R E P P S C B C E Y H F I M E C N S C Y A A I I Q I H I C I Y B S E 
F M S Y Y I N A B T S A A N F P I A N B A B M I C N R H I N R B M E B G S Y R I Y F D Q D B Y S B M Q D P S Y 
H N G E R R S B B I P P C M E B B S B M N R O I S K N B F C B B M E B A M I P S C I A M N Q C N B M E R N R Y 
E L I H E K K I G B N S R N B N A T E A B B M I N R K N R N B I S K B M S C L M B Q E D F I A M I H S B M F C 
B G S C R B I Y K I N B K E N B M P N O I I R S C L M S L S H G S C R B I Y K I N B B M I Y I C E A R I C I Y G S C 
R B I Y K I N B S K T E A A N S R G E Q I A S R I I Y I B M I P N K I S K T E A A N S R E A A M I H N A G S C I Y 
A N B

* * *

Only one of Shake-speares Sonnets is falsely numbered. Sonnet 116 is shown as verse 119. The first five lines are:

Let me not to the marriage of true mindes
Admit impediments, love is not love
Which alters when it alteration findes,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
O no, it is an euer fixed marke

The ciphertext is:
L E T M E N O T T O T H E M A R R I A G E O F T R V E M I N D E S A D M I T I M P E D I M E N T S L O V E I S 
N O T L O V E V H I C H A L T E R S V H E N I T A L T E R A T I O N F I N D E S O R B E N D S V I T H T H E R E 
M O V E R T O R E M O V E O N O I T I S A N E V E R F I E D M A R K E

Plaintext, +4 is:

P I B Q I R S B B S B M I Q E Y Y N E L I S K B Y C I Q N R H I A E H Q N B N Q T I H N Q I R B A P S C I N A R S 
B P S C I C M N G M E P B I Y A C M I R N B E P B I Y E B N S R K N R H I A S Y F I R H A C N B M B M I Y I Q S 
C I Y B S Y I Q S C I S R S N B N A E R I C I Y K N I H Q E Y O I

Plaintext, alternate odd letters:

P B I S B B I E Y E I K Y I N H A H N N T H Q R A S I A S P C C N M P I A M R B P I E N R N H A Y I H C B B I I S 
I B Y Q C S S B A R C Y N H E O

Plaintext, alternate even letters:

I Q R B S M Q Y N L S B C Q R I E Q B Q I N I B P C N R B S I M G E B Y C I N E B Y B S K R I S F R A N M M Y Q 
C Y S I S I R N N E I I K I Q Y I

Sir Francis Bacon's misnumbered sonnet has an engaging conclusion. The last two lines are:

If this be error and vpon me proved,
I neuer writ, nor no man euer loved.

* * *

In "As you like it." (ii, 4, 57) we find, "name, Bacon, cipher" together in these lines:

Clo. . . wee that are true Louers, runne into strange capers; but as all is mortall in nature, so is all nature in loue, 
mortall in folly.
Ros. Thou speakst wiser then thou art ware of.
Clo. Nay, I shall nere be ware of mine owne wit, till I breake my shins against it.
Ros. Ioue, Ioue, this Shepherds passion, Is much vpon my fashion.

Ciphertext is:
T H O V S P E A K S T V I S E R T H E N T H O V A R T V A R E O F N A Y I S H A L L N E R E B E V A R E O F M 
I N E O V N E V I T T I L L I B R E A K E M Y S H I N S A G A I N S T I T I O V E I O V E T H I S S H E P H E R D S 
P A S S I O N

Plaintext, +4 is:

B M S C A T I E O A B C N A I Y B M I R B M S C E Y B C E Y I S K R E D N A M E P P R I Y I F I C E Y I S K Q N R 
I S C R I C N B B N P P N F Y I E O I Q D A M N R A E L E N R A B N B N S C I N S C I B M N A A M I T M I Y H 
A T E A A N S R

Plaintext, alternate letters:

B S A I O B N I B I B S E B E I K E N M P R Y F C Y S Q R S R C B N P F I O Q A N A L N A N N C N C B N A I M Y 
A E A S

Ciphertext reversed:

N O I S S A P S D R E H P E H S S I H T E V O I E V O I T I T S N I A G A S N I H S Y M E K A E R B I L L I T T I V 
E N V O E N I M F O E R A V E B E R E N L L A H S I Y A N F O E R A V T R A V O H T N E H T R E S I V T S K A 
E P S V O H T

Plaintext, +4 is:

R S N A A E T A H Y I M T I M A A N M B I C S N I C S N B N B A R N E L E A R N M A D Q I O E I Y F N P P N 
B B N C I R C S I R N Q K S I Y E C I F I Y I R P P E M A N D E R K S I Y E C B Y E C S M B R I M B Y I A N C B A 
O E I T A C S M B

* * *

Does our author sometimes offer us a hint, a brazen "insinuating nod"? Read this, from "The Tragedie of 
Coriolanus," (ii, 3, 105):

I will practice the insinuating nod, and be off to them most counterfetly, that is sir, I will counterfet the bewitchment 
of some popular man,

We may pardon the typesetters errors--we know what he meant to spell:

Ciphertext is:
I V I L L P R A C T I C E T H E I N S I N V A T I N G N O D A N D B E O F F T O T H E M M O S T C O V N T E R 
F E I T L Y T H A T I S S I R I V I L L C O V N T E R F E I T T H E B E V I T C H M E N T O F S O M E P O P V L A 
R M A N

Plaintext, +4 is:

N C N P P T Y E G B N G I B M I N R A N R C E B N R L R S H E R H F I S K K B S B M I Q Q S A B G S C R B I Y K 
I N B P D B M E B N A A N Y N C N P P G S C R B I Y K I N B B M I F I C N B G M Q I R B S K A S Q I T S T C P E 
Y Q E R

Plaintext, +4 reversed is:

R E Q Y E P C T S T I Q S A K S B R I Q M G B N C I F I M B B N I K Y I B R C S G P P N C N Y N A A N B E M B D 
P B N I K Y I B R C S G B A S Q Q I M B S B K K S I F H R E H S R L R N B E C R N A R N I M B I G N B G E Y T P 
P N C N

So, we see our familiar "counterfeit" word again, in reference to the spurious name "of some popular man." In fact, 
the term is repeated for greater significance, and it is coupled once more with "SIFHRE."